Beyond the 1% – ProArms Podcast

My bossman, Karl Rehn of KR Training, was interviewed for Episode 98 of the ProArms Podcast.

It was about his presentation, “Beyond the One Percent” (8 part series starts here).

Give it a listen!

 

2017-04-17 training log

Another cycle begins. This is technically cycle 5, since resetting. Things seem to be progressing well. Today was a couple interesting mental milestones.

First, 300’s. Today was the first time of hitting 300’s during my “light” day. No more flirting in the 300’s, where maybe I do 1 or 2 sets in the 300’s during a cycle. No, this is the light day and I’m 300’s. So for whatever reason, it still messes with my head a bit, but I can easily put it out because I know I won’t have any problems. I mean, if I’m scheduled for 300 today, hitting at least 5 reps should be easy, right?

I hit 7 reps, which is a rep PR at that weight, so that’s cool. I had at least one left in the tank, and was good with that as that’s where it should be. I look at charts and progression, where a theoretical 1RM is (375 or so), and that’s pretty darn cool to me, to see this sort of progression after so long. I feel confident that by the end of the year the goal of 405 is attainable. So 300’s don’t really mess with me much; at this point it’s just cool to be finally in the 300’s. 🙂

Second, 230. 230# is an interesting number for me, especially on squats, because way back when I was starting and doing Starting Strength I had worked up to 230 and plateaued there for quite a while. It was a confounding number for me because I worked and worked and couldn’t bust through. I also know that while it was 230, it was a terrible 230. Horrible form, probably cut dept short. Just poor. But now? It’s just a warm-up weight. Now? After PR’ing at 300×7, I’m doing 3×5 pause squats with that weight. So, any time I have 230 it’s always a step back for me, to remember how things were, and to see how far I’ve come. And yes, that I still have a ways to go. But, just keep at it.

So all in all, good day. Rep PR, pause squats went well. Lunges took a bunch out of me because I took very long strides. But all good work put in.

Oh, there was one point of concern/interest. During pause squats I noticed when I came out of the hole my right leg would… it’s hard to describe, but instead of the leg extending straight, there was a sort of outward “push”. Basically instead of straight forces extending, some lateral forces. Basically this could be a knee-blowout in the making. I don’t know how long I’ve been doing this, but I did notice it and once I did worked to ensure “straighter” forces on extension. I will have to keep an eye on this.

  • Squats
    • bar x whatever
    • 140 x 5
    • 175 x 5
    • 210 x 3
    • 230 x 5
    • 265 x 5
    • 300 x 7 (7 rep PR)
  • Pause Squat
    • 230 x 5
    • 230 x 5
    • 230 x 5
  • Lunges
    • BW x 12e
    • BW x 12e
    • BW x 10e
    • BW x 9e
  • Leg Extensions
    • 50 x 12
    • 50 x 12
    • 50 x 12
  • Twisting Crunches
    • BW x 20
    • BW x 16
    • BW x 10

Sunday Metal – Crowbar

Another fairly recent release that I’ve been digging: Crowbar “The Serpent Only Lies”

Here’s the title track:

It’s day after day
The fight to rise and win
Conquer it all
It’s day after day
The fight to rise and win
Conquer it all
Don’t let your soul descend,

Being reluctant to shoot, but eager to know

On April 1, 2017, KR Training ran it’s Defensive Pistol Skills 1 and Defensive Pistol Skills 2 classes. It may have been April Fools Day, but what I want to talk about is no joke.

These particular classes are about gunfighting. These are classes were we work to impress upon students the reality of self-defense with a handgun. It’s fast, it’s ugly, it’s full of pressure. You have to perform at a high-level, usually starting from a deficit, and you must make split-second decisions (these classes are often a sobering reality and wake-up to students).

It’s that last part – split-second decisions – I want to talk about.

Context

Let me explain the context of class.

In DPS-2, we run each student through a shoot house scenario. The intent of the exercise is to introduce students to the notions of moving through structures, use of cover and concealment, and target discernment.

Target discernment.

You see, upon our hip we have a hammer – but we must realize that the world contains more than nails. What complicates matters is some things may appear to be nails, but really are not. Furthermore, we are “good guys”; which means we operate within the constraints of the law, both the laws of men and the laws of morality.

In terms of a curriculum progression, certainly it makes sense to first teach people general marksmanship as well as basic default response to a threat; you have to teach foundational and fundamental skills first. Once people begin to understand the fundamentals, you progress to more complex, complicated, and advanced concepts. One of those is target discernment.

Setting

In this particular run of the shoot house, the situation was framed that you have pulled up to your home in your car and parked in the driveway. You get out of your car and you see… this. The “this” starts out with 2 targets across from you: one is a reactive target (i.e. if you shoot it properly it will fall down) with a threat indicator (a gun), the other is a reactive target with a not-threat indicator (hands up). The student begins by analyzing what they see and responding accordingly.

The student is then to move “into the house”. As they approach the opening, they see way down the hallway – about 15-20 yards away – this target:

When you look at this picture from the comfort of your office or living room, with no pressure, no need to make a decision, as you casually read this article, you can probably figure out what it is that you are seeing.

But when it’s 15-20 yards away, when you have a split second to make a decision, when you are under pressure, it’s not so clear.

Discernment – is this a threat or not – is difficult. Just because it is difficult, doesn’t mean it isn’t important; in fact, it means we need to work harder at it.

Reactions

With about a dozen students in class, responses were wide and varied.

Some people immediately extended their gun and shot.

Some people started to extend their gun, but realized they weren’t sure what they were looking at. (some thought “a grenade?”)

Some people stepped aside (out of line of sight, behind cover/concealment).

Some immediately questioned what they saw.

Some where not sure what they saw and what to do.

From there, responses continued typically with my interaction (i.e. me playing the part of either a “narrator” or role-playing the target).

Of those who wondered or weren’t sure what they were seeing, I asked them what they thought they should do. The basic idea? If you don’t know what it is, work to gain more information so you can become more certain about what it is. Some people wanted to get closer, and while that’s an understandable reaction, it’s not necessarily the safest tactics. What else could they do? They could shout commands, like “DROP IT!” If they did this, I roled-played the target and he dropped it. Of course, another solid response is “don’t go in the house at all; back out and call the police” (that’s really the best general response, but for purposes of the exercise we continue forward).

Of those that were quick to go to guns, I asked them why they did so. Some said “he was in my house”. One gentleman didn’t have his contacts in and wasn’t totally sure what he was looking at, but the general appearance and context was enough for him to perceive a threat. Generally afterwards, showing them what the target actually was caused a bit of reconsideration.

What’s key here is how people perceived the (total) situation, how they assessed threat, and how they chose to respond.

Response

I’m not going to fault any student for whatever their response was. This is class. This is the place to come to make mistakes, to learn, to become better. One of the hallmarks of training is how it provides a forgiving learning ground to learn what to do and what not to do, so when you actually have to do something in the unforgiving real-world, you can do it better and minimize chances of doing it wrong (and risk making things worse).

There’s a few take-homes here.

First, realize how situations can unfold. This scenario started with a context of “trouble”, so human nature is going to expect trouble to continue. When you see something else that’s abnormal – in this case, a strange person supposedly within your home thrusting an object towards you – when a split-second decision needs to be made, we process the situation based upon what information we have.

Take for example a recently released dashcam of an Opelika, Alabama police officer shooting a man on the side of the road in 2014. Every police officer knows that road-side stops are one of the most dangerous events in police work. It’s dark. Pull up on scene, man goes to exit his vehicle. As he exits, he turns towards the officer, something dark in his hands, and he clasps his hands together.

As the situation is unfolding, what might that officer be thinking?

Here’s a freeze-frame from 0:23 into the video. What does that look like?

If you are someone educated in violent behavior (as police tend to be), that certainly looks like someone holding a gun, preparing to extend their arms to shoot. And not just shoot, but shoot at me.

It’s only in hindsight, it’s only with the benefit of sitting in our armchairs, that we can speak otherwise about this event. You can watch the full dashcam here.

I’m making no commentary on that specific event. What I am trying to point out is how there is reality in situations, how they frame events in our minds, and then how it affects our perceptions, especially in the seconds as events unfold. As well, simple objects that aren’t a weapon may not be so obviously-not-a-weapon as situations are unfolding.

We must work to be certain, or as certain as we can be.

Second, rid yourself of absolute mindsets. By that I mean mindsets like “if they’re in my house, they’re getting shot”. I hear this expressed far too often, with people proudly exclaiming how any unknown person in their house is getting shot, no questions, no discerement, no nothing. This is a recipe for trouble.

Claude Werner speaks of Negative Outcomes.  For example:

Deputies found a 32-year-old man who said that he and his wife were sleeping when they heard a noise in the kitchen.

The husband took his handgun and walked in the kitchen area, where he shot the victim.

After the shooting the husband recognized the victim as his younger teenage brother.

Full story, and Claude’s analysis can be found here.

Something as simple as shouting “Who’s there?” could have prevented tragedy.

(Aside: I highly recommend reading anything and everything Claude writes; if you need a place to start, start with his series on Negative Outcomes).

Think

There’s a time to go to guns, and there’s a lot of times not to. Even if we don’t shoot, pointing a gun at someone is aggravated assault. I’m not saying not to point guns at people when that needs to happen, but we need to be as certain as we can that it actually needs to happen. Because whatever happens, it’s likely it will become necessary for you to articulate why you did what you did. To be able to validly express the ability, the opportunity, the jeopardy of the situation.

At this point in one’s training, one must learn discernment. One needs to move beyond the simple physical skills of “point and click” and work to first engage the brain. In a sense, we should be reluctant to go to guns, but we should be eager to acquire the knowledge necessary to know if we should go to guns – or not.

Because in an instant, what will happen will happen and you cannot take it back.

2017-04-14 training log

Deload.

  • Press (superset with pulldowns)
    • bar x whatever
    • 70 x 5
    • 70 x 5
    • 90 x 5
    • 90 x 5
    • 110 x 5
    • 110 x 5
  • Lat Pulldowns (pronated grip, to chest)
    • 110 x 12
    • 110 x 12
    • 120 x 12
    • 120 x 12
    • 130 x 12
    • 130 x 12
  • Dips (superset with shrugs)
    • BW x 8
    • BW x 8
  • DB Shrugs
    • 80e x 15
    • 80e x 15
  • Front Plate Raises (all the way above head)
    • 25 x 15
    • 25 x 15
  • Skullcrushers
    • 70 x 12
    • 70 x 12
  • Hammer Curl
    • 40e x 10
    • 40e x 10

2017-04-13 training log

Deload. Nothing to write home about.

  • Deadlift
    • 170 x 5
    • 170 x 5
    • 210 x 5
    • 210 x 5
    • 250 x 5
    • 250 x 5
  • Hyperextensions
    • BW x 12
    • BW x 12
  • Leg Curls
    • 40 x 12
    • 40 x 12
  • Crunches
    • BW x 20

You never have a problem – until you do

It’s the mantra of “the gear investor”:

“Works great for me!”

“Used it for years; never had a problem.”

Or whatever justification that their chosen gear is right, good, and infallible. The defense of the product is even stronger when the gear is demonstrably worse and the ego-investment in it even higher. What’s often implied by these statements is a belief that it hasn’t failed – and it won’t.

Here’s the thing.

All gear will fail. It’s not a question of “if” but “when”.

Gear has parts, and parts wear out and break.

Gear is made by humans, and the fallible creatures we are, we will make mistakes in the manufacture and assembly of that gear.

Of course, good, quality gear strives to be reliable and minimize chances of failure, but it still will happen.

Case in point.

This past weekend I reached into my pants pocket to get my keys. Withdrawing the keys felt different and I quickly learned why. My ASP Street Defender (pepper spray) had become detached from my keys. The tail-cap? It somehow managed to  completely unscrew itself while in my pocket. I have no idea how that happened, but it happened.

My gear failed me.

I’ve carried it every day for over a year. It worked great for me. I’ve never had a problem.

Until I did.

To remedy this, I put a drop of blue Loctite on the cap’s threads, which should minimize the chances of it happening again.

But think about it. Honestly assess how “stuff” has failed you. You may not have thought much about it because the failure came at a “safe” time. Maybe you were on the range just plinking and your gun went “click” instead of “bang”. You probably didn’t think much of it, remedied the situation, and moved on. But that was a failure.

Failure can and will happen, even to that precious piece of gear that hasn’t failed you… yet.

Because of course your gear never has a problem… until it does.

2017-04-11 training log

Deload continues.

Today was an interesting experiment.

First, bench technique. I was watching someone’s bench video and they had comments about tightness, including squeezing the glutes. One thing I’ve struggled with is keeping the lower body tight while I bench, and glute squeeze makes a lot of sense both in terms of actually being tight AND helping to encourage overall lower body tightness. So I tried it, but alas, I will need to really modify my technique. Either putting my feet way behind me (closer to my head) or way out away from me (legs almost straight). It’s a matter of longer legs, not quite a competition bench height. Because when I squeeze like that, you can’t help but have the lower half rise up to a certain level, then you need to adust everything else to meet it. I’m very curious and still should play with this some, but for now I’ll just file it away.

I didn’t feel much arm/elbow pain until later — DB benching. It felt like in the bottom position the DBs were close to my body and caused a more acute elbow angle, thus. Kinda interesting observation. I may reduce the DB weights and keep them further away from my body to see what happens. Or I may move away from DB’s for a bit and maybe do inclines. I don’t know. If anything, I expected today might give me some idea of where to go, but it just gave me more questions.

That said, my current feeling is to take a Paul Carter-like approach. Keep the 6 sets working up, but 5/4/3/2/1/1+ rep scheme. The + on the last set is that in general I will not go for 5/3/1 prescribed reps, just focus on the single — and this is every week, regardless of weight. So the progression remains 5/3/1 but the rep scheme is Carter’s. If however I am feeling good, go ahead and go for reps on that last set. Then instead of the pyramid down sets I may not do anything additional, or I may try for a simple first-set-last or something of the like. Something where I get some volume and some work, but again it’s all going to depend on how things feel.

Otherwise, it’s just a deload.

  • Bench Press (superset cable rows)
    • bar x whatever
    • 105 x 5
    • 105 x 5
    • 130 x 5
    • 130 x 5
    • 155 x 5
    • 155 x 5
  • Cable Rows
    • 105 x 12
    • 105 x 12
    • 115 x 12
    • 115 x 12
    • 125 x 12
    • 125 x 12
  • DB Bench Press (superset with Kroc rows)
    • 75e x 10
    • 75e x 10
  • Kroc Row
    • 50 x 10
    • 50 x 10
  • DB Upright Row
    • 25e x 15
    • 25e x 15
  • Overhead Rope Extensions
    • 60 x 15
    • 60 x 10
  • EZ Bar Curl (narrow grip)
    • 55 x 15
    • 55 x 15

2017-04-10 training log

Deload.

I’m taking the week off work, so I opted to take this week as a deload — a full life deload.

I did think about making this a jack-shit deload, but nah…. I think some work will do me better, especially as I work to figure out what to do about bench pressing and my arm pain (again). I’m formulating a plan for that, and we’ll see how things feel during/after tomorrow’s (deload) bench session.

As for today, no big. It’s just deload. Move quickly between sets (1 minute rest, if that), and just get some light work in and get out.

  • Squats
    • bar x whatever
    • 135 x 5
    • 135 x 5
    • 170 x 5
    • 170 x 5
    • 205 x 5
    • 205 x 5
  • Pause Squat
    • 220 x 3
    • 220 x 3
  • Lunges
    • BW x 10e
    • BW x 10e
  • Leg Extensions
    • 50 x 10
    • 50 x 10
  • Twisting Crunches
    • BW x 10
    • BW x 10

Sunday Metal – Marilyn Manson

Another heavy rotation as of late is some Marilyn Manson. I admit, he’s growing on me.

“This is the New Shit”