2012-09-15 live fire practice

Following TLG’s sample dry fire routine.

The routine allows for substitution of live fire for dry fire, so my “week 1 day 5” was replaced with some live fire.

I was assisting at KR Training, so I didn’t get to do much formal, but I did a few things.

Let’s just say I stunk up the joint.

*sigh*

Well, I’ll break down some things.

Before DPS1 we do a pre-test with some reactive targets. I was going to demonstrate something to a student. No prep, no forethought that I was going to do this, it just happened as the course of conversation went to say “this is what you do”, and I just drew, 1 shot on target 1, 1 shot on target 2, both reactives fell over, and that was that. There was no thought, no nothing, cold, nailed it in short order.

That made me quite happy. Of course that’s what I should do, but what got me about it was hitting it cold, no thought, no prep, no nothing. Very happy with that.

But later on, there’s this “hostage” target Karl has, where it looks like a large steel IDPA/IPSC-shaped no-shoot with a small flapper just over the shoulder… probably 4-6″ (one of these days I need to measure precisely how much is exposed). It was probably 20 yards from me. I went through 3 magazines: 1 2H, 1 SHO, 1 WHO. I thought I was doing OK because I kept listening for the distinctive “flap” sound it makes when you hit it. Then Hogel comes up and asked who shot up the no-shoot — “because I just painted it”. *sigh* Looks like it was me, having a bunch of “near target hits”, or rather, unacceptable hits on the hostage. *sigh* Looks like the flapper activated either from splatter or impact vibration. *sigh*  I was most upset with that, thinking I was doing well, but I wasn’t.

On some other steel work, I was hitting poorly. I could tell what it was: trigger slapping, plain and simple.

The bad part was, I just didn’t have enough time to shoot on my own to really work and try to diagnose the problem. To shoot as I have in dry fire. There’s still a disconnect in my head somewhere. I need to figure some things out, collect my thoughts, then go talk with Karl.

2012-07-19 Dry Fire Practice

Following the TLG 4-week sample dry fire routine.

Week 1, Day 4

Basic routine

  1. 20 reps of Wall Drill, from extension 2H
  2. 5 reps of Wall Drill from extension, SHO
  3. 5 reps of Wall Drill from extension, WHO
  4. 20 reps of Wall Drill from press-out, 2H
  5. 5 reps of Wall Drill from press-out, SHO
  6. 5 reps of Wall Drill from press-out, WHO

Trying to get my groove back regarding practice sessions.

Trying to focus on picking up speed, but again, not necessarily by going faster, but by ensuring no time is wasted. Press out and press trigger with less time wasted in doing both… so the time between “start” and “click” is used as wisely as possible.

2012-09-12 dry fire practice

Following TLG’s sample dry fire routine.

Week 1, Day 3, reloads

  1. 10 reps of wall drill from press-out 2H
  2. 20 reps reload from slidelock, slow, 2H
  3. 20 reps reload from slidelock, 3/4 speed, 2H
  4. 10 reps reload from slidelock, slow, 2H
  5. 10 reps of wall drill form press-out, 2H

I’ve been falling a little behind in my practice, but dedication and accountability are motivators.

Keeping the gun up in your line of sight is useful. That is, you’re reloading almost in front of your face… not in front of your chest, nor your stomach. But yes, way up there. Not only keeps whatever was downrange in your field of vision, but it means there’s less for you to have to hunt and find when you shift your vision back to the target. Plus it means less movement for your hands and gun since they are ready to “ride the rail” of the eye-target-line back out, instead of having to get brought back up there. Every tenth of a second matters.

 

2012-09-12 dry fire practice

Following TLG’s sample dry fire routine.

Week 1, Day 2, draws.

  1. 10 reps of wall drill from press-out 2H
  2. 20 reps of wall drill from holster 2H
  3. 5 reps of wall drill from holster, SHO
  4. 5 reps of wall drill from holster, WHO
  5. 10 reps draw & fire at 3/4 speed, 2H
  6. 10 reps draw & fire slow 2H

The day job has been taking a lot of my time, so blogging has been light.

I did get this done, just couldn’t post until today.

I can’t wait to verify my dry skills with some live work.

2012-09-09 dry fire practice

Following TLG’s sample dry fire routine.

Week 4, Day 3 (makeup), low-light

  1. 10 reps wall drill, SHO with flashlight
  2. 10 reps ID, move right, engage
  3. 10 reps ID, move left, engage
  4. 5 reps ID, draw on the move, engage
  5. 5 reps reload in the dark
  6. 10 reps wall drill, SHO with flashlight

I missed doing this day in the course of the normal rotation, thus I had to make up the missed session. Just took care of that.

I’m looking forward to October 20 @ KR Training. Going to have Defensive Pistol Skills 2, AT-2 Scenarios, and AT-1A Low Light Shooting. We can only do these days 2x a year because of the realities of light. It’s a LONG day, but always well-worth it.

If you’re in the area and haven’t taken any of these classes, you should consider it. The only class I’d put a hard prerequisite on would be DPS2 — you should be a graduate of DPS1. But AT-2 and AT-1A? Sign up. AT-1A, because of the flashlight requirement, will be a lot of one-handed shooting. And while AT-2 is “force on force” it’s not hard-core. Don’t let either of these two notions scare you off. In fact, if you feel a little unsure or challenged by it, I’d say that’s a good sign you should take it. Get your feet wet, break the ice, and take your skills to a higher level.

2012-09-07 dry fire practice

Following TLG’s sample dry fire routine.

Week 4, Day 5, shooter’s choice.

Given last week’s WHO work, I opted to do the basic routine but emphasizing WHO again.

  1. 20 reps of wall drill from extension WHO
  2. 5 reps of wall drill from extension SHO
  3. 5 reps of wall drill from extension 2H
  4. 20 reps of wall drill from press-out WHO
  5. 5 reps of wall drill from press-out SHO
  6. 5 reps of wall drill from press-out 2H

I just wanted more WHO work.

But I’m also working on slowing down and not going overall faster than I can do everything smooth and together. For example, trying to reduce the time between extension and the trigger break. Get things going faster and with a “good enough” sight picture.

2012-09-06 dry fire practice

Following TLG’s sample dry fire routine.

Week 4, Day 4, basic routine

  1. 20 reps of wall drill from extension 2H
  2. 5 reps of wall drill from extension SHO
  3. 5 reps of wall drill from extension WHO
  4. 20 reps of wall drill from press-out 2H
  5. 5 reps of wall drill from press-out SHO
  6. 5 reps of wall drill from press-out WHO

First… I missed yesterday’s practice. 😦  First missed practice in almost 2 months. Dang it. The day just got away from me. Since it’s a flashlight routine and the days are getting shorter, I wanted to do it before bed but… bed beat me. 😦  I’ll make up the session this weekend.

As for today’s practice, I’m working on pressing out faster and ensuring I get the trigger break just as I get to extension. WHO needs more work in that area. 🙂

2012-09-04 dry fire practice

Following TLG’s sample dry fire routine.

Week 4, Day 2, WHO (all drills WHO)

  1. 20 reps of wall drill from press-out
  2. 10 reps draw & fire, slow
  3. 10 reps draw & fire 3/4 speed
  4. 5 reps reload from slidelock, slow
  5. 5 reps reload from slidelock 3/4 speed
  6. 5 reps TRB
  7. 5 reps LRW
  8. 10 reps wall drill from press-out

I’m happy for the additional WHO practice… probably something I can’t get enough of. Makes me think that for the next “monthly cycle” I might do something like throw in 10 (additional) WHO press-outs every session and see what it does for me.

One thing I need to work on is just pressing out faster. I go slower on my press out because otherwise things get too loose and I don’t get it lined up right. Well, I need to press myself a little faster. I do this and things work out, so I just keep to keep doing it and not slow down on the press out. If I need a bit of time at the end, fine but at least get the gun out there and overall compress the time.

2012-09-03 dry fire practice

Following TLG’s sample dry fire routine.

Week 4, Day 1, basic routine

  1. 20 reps of wall drill from extension 2H
  2. 5 reps of wall drill from extension SHO
  3. 5 reps of wall drill from extension WHO
  4. 20 reps of wall drill from press-out 2H
  5. 5 reps of wall drill from press-out SHO
  6. 5 reps of wall drill from press-out WHO

I practiced last night just before bed… got the practice in, just had to post this the next day.

The press-out felt much more natural. Things just flowed nicely in this routine. I do feel that I need to get to the range and confirm progress with live-fire practice, but time has been tight and I’ll be out to KR Training eventually anyways so I can just wait until then. But it does feel that a month of dry fire followed up with a day at the range to confirm and figure out what to work on (next) would be an ideal cycle.

2012-08-31 dry fire practice

Following TLG’s sample dry fire routine.

Week 3, Day 5, shooter’s choice.

Given yesterday’s WHO thoughts, I opted to do the basic routine but emphasizing WHO

  1. 20 reps of wall drill from extension WHO
  2. 5 reps of wall drill from extension SHO
  3. 5 reps of wall drill from extension 2H
  4. 20 reps of wall drill from press-out WHO
  5. 5 reps of wall drill from press-out SHO
  6. 5 reps of wall drill from press-out 2H

I’m not sure I can “ride the rail” of the eye-target line here, at least literally. The gun is coming from a different point, NOT under my right eye. It helps that I’m right eye dominant and right-handed, so naturally they’re all lined up and it is truly just a “ride the rail” press-out. But now with the gun in my left hand, bringing it under my right eye and out doesn’t work so well because the gun is also in my hand at a different angle so the front and rear sights don’t align with the “rail”. So, this is a time where I have to remove the literalness of it all. And doing that helped.

But what really helped?

I know how critical a strong grip is to making this work, especially important in WHO because it is the weak hand. I worked on not just crushing my grip, but really involving the pinky in the crush.

What a difference.

Of course, that shouldn’t surprise me. I know this from my years of martial arts training how critical the pinky is for making grip. But it’s just something that gets lost and doesn’t always happen because it’s not normal (still) for me to grip primarily, if you will, using the pinky. While it makes a good difference in any grip situation, it’s especially important in handgun shooting because of the counter-torque it provides against the recoiling gun.

When I did my SHO and 2H, it was even better because of that.

So there’s something for me to fall back on every now and again: crush with the WHO pinky.