KR Training 2014-08-30 – DLG-E Quick Hits

This past Saturday was an especially good one for me. KR Training was holding two classes: Defensive Long Gun Essentials and Skill Builder. But it was a slightly different day for me.

I was Dad, in addition to assisting.

Oldest was a student in the DLG-E class. You see, all this summer, Oldest has been “chore boy” at the KR Training ranch, mostly doing a lot of the lawn mowing (it’s a lot of acreage to mow). Karl gave him a slot in the DLG-E class as a bonus for all his hard work this summer (thanx, Karl!). Oldest is just starting down the road of formal firearms education. Sure I’ve showed him things and we go shooting when we can, but I firmly believe in the benefits of formal education and schooling. Plus, sometimes kids listen to others better, or at least differently, than their parents.

How’d he do? Fine. There’s certainly things for him to work on, but it seems he did well in the class. He certainly had a lot of fun and got to experience new things. One of which was going through the shoot house.

I did run the shoot house, and we did something different: we had verbal interactions. Instead of just using visual cues for target discernment, students were encouraged to interact with the photorealistic targets: “Stop!” “Show me your hands!” or whatever command they wanted to try. Then I would react in whatever way was appropriate, to help the student learn about the importance of making decisions.

What came out of this? While “bang bang” is fun, it’s just one — and arguable a minor — skill to master compared to others, such as threat management, or as SouthNarc calls it “Managing Unknown Contacts”.

As coincidence has it, Claude Werner was just on Ballistic Radio talking about this very thing. As I write this, I haven’t listened to that episode yet, but given the write-up, it seems quite relevant.

The other thing I recommend folks look at is anything from Craig “SouthNarc” Douglas regarding the topic of “Managing Unknown Contacts” (MUC). If you don’t get a chance to study with Craig, see if you can find a copy of his “Practical Unarmed Combat” DVD as it covers some basics of MUC. And yes, SouthNarc is coming to KR Training in March 2015 for his ECQC course.

Side note: one student in class (my friend Rog) was running a pump shotgun. He was shooting some Winchester PDX, both their buck and slugs. He had an extremely difficult failure to extract with a slug (probably a combination of a hot slug and dirty chamber — I put the muscles to good use and was able to eventually clear the chamber). The buck claims to have tighter patterns, and it is tighter than cheap buckshot, but it just cannot compete with Federal Premium FLITECONTROL buckshot. I wish Federal was paying me (or giving me free ammo) for all the promotion of their product, but alas they are not — we just have witnessed the performance and nothing can come close. Said it before, say it again: Federal Premium 12 gauge FLITECONTROL 00 buckshot, low recoil (1145 fps, vs 1325 fps)  if you can find it, and 8 (vs. 9) pellet if you can find it.

The weather was great! Things are getting unstable here in Texas, with some rain finally coming down, but the predictions for more changing every hour. The morning looked like it might come down, but it just got better as the day wore on. Couldn’t have asked for a finer day, weather wise.

Plus I got to spend more quality time with my son. He’s not just Oldest, but certainly getting older. Time is precious.

Alas, I didn’t get to stay for the Skill Builder class as Oldest had somewhere to be. But hey… I couldn’t ask for a better day. 🙂

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2 thoughts on “KR Training 2014-08-30 – DLG-E Quick Hits

  1. GASP !

    You let a child handle a semi-automatic firearm ! Oh, no. The world didn’t.;how can that be?

    Instead of just using visual cues for target discernment, students were encouraged to interact with the photorealistic targets: “Stop!” “Show me your hands!” or whatever command they wanted to try.

    In my discussions with people; I try to make a simple observation about managing contacts and verbal communication. The idea is simply “Whatever you say can be used at your trial”.

    Don’t leave it to chance or spur of the moment to decide what you are going to say. We practice a great many other things; in this we can borrow from the law enforcement ‘force continuum’. If nothing else, it shows that the criminal ignored clear and concise instructions to stop.

    Plus I got to spend more quality time with my son. He’s not just Oldest, but certainly getting older. Time is precious.

    Lot of things I regret; spending time with my kids as they grew up isn’t one of them. Not in the least.

    Bob S.

    • Define “child”. He’s my son, but he’s not a “child” by most definitions. Of course that’s part of the issue in any statistics that quote “children”. When most people hear that word, they tend to think kids of single-digit ages. There are some statistical collections that will count those under the age of 25 as “children”… but most reasonable people would not consider a 23 year old or 21 or even 18 year old to be a “child”. But hey… when you can pump up your numbers by loosening up your definition….

      On the topic of what to say, I agree. You should have a well-defined set of commands and know them beforehand. In KR Training’s Defensive Pistol Skills 1 class, when we introduce the topic of commands, we use “STOP! DON’T! MOVE!”. Me? I like SouthNarc’s 3 levels, using commands like “Hey, can you back up?” then “Back up!” then “BACK THE FUCK UP!”. You can pick the words you want to use there (those are mine), but it’s the concept of the escalation. In this particular exercise tho, I didn’t want to impart too much upon the students — it was designed to be an introductory thing, a learning experience, and often times you gain more from some stumbling — you will not only learn about commands, but you’ll learn how not having it figured out beforehand causes you trouble. So, it’s all intentional in what we did, as it leads towards a better and deeper understanding of the topic. 🙂

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