2015-07-06 training log

Oh man… haven’t felt that “good” in ages.

And by “good” I mean, almost throwing up. ;-)

No, I don’t like working out to the point of puking: I don’t see how that’s a positive thing nor what it accomplishes. But sometimes it happens. All through the split squats, I just got more and more nauseous, so I pushed but not too hard because no, I have no desire to throw up.

But it all started with the squats.

I used last week as a deload, lifting lightly and trying to take as much rest/sleep/naps as possible. I feel a lot better. Not out of the woods, but better for sure. And so I continued ignoring how many reps and told myself to just keep going until I can’t go any more — don’t sow any mental limits. 14 reps came pretty easily. Felt good. But then the 7 after started the toll-taking.

And 15 reps of the stiff-legs. I swear, this was the first time I really felt it in my hamstrings and glutes. I truly was burning. It was pretty cool to finally feel that back there from this movement. But yeah, the toll was being taken. And so split squats? Oh… I just did what I could. :-)

All in all tho, good session. More reps came out, and I just generally feel alright. Weight bloated up over the end of last week, between less work and enjoying myself some over the holiday. But I’m back down to 222 this morning, so I’m in pretty good shape. In discussions with Nick I’m going to work to hold steady now, and come August we’ll start the cut again. I have mixed emotions — I don’t want to go back on the restrictive diet, but I really do want to achieve my goal in the Defattening Project. So, onwards.

Based on Paul Carter’s “Guaranteed Muscle Mass” article.

  • Squat
    • bar x 5
    • bar x 5
    • 125 x 5
    • 155 x 4
    • 185 x 3
    • 235 x 2
    • 265 x 1
    • 215 x 14 (AMRAP)
    • 215 x 7 (50%)
  • Stiff Legged Deadlift
    • 145 x 5
    • 175 x 4
    • 215 x 3
    • 265 x 2
    • 305 x 1
    • 245 x 15 (AMRAP)
  • Split Squats
    • BW x 10
    • BW x 10
    • BW x 10
    • BW x 10
    • BW x 10

Sunday Metal – Songs of My Youth – The Coup de Grace

I like giving “Sunday Metal” a theme, and so this theme is “Songs of My Youth”. I found heavy metal as a teenager and it’s always been a big part of my life. I wanted to highlight some songs that stand out from those youthful days.

The Coup de Grace are probably still relatively unknown to most of you. They were a band out of the Minneapolis area, and I got to know of them because I had a good relationship with their record label, Red Decibel. Hooray days of college radio.

What I remember most was traveling to NYC for a music convention, where they happened to be playing on my birthday (or just around it; I honestly don’t recall the exact date). Getting to see the band, hang out with them, and party quite well with them, made for a great birthday present. I can remember a lot about that evening, but I just can’t retell it here. :-)

 

The fallout of jackassery

I love Whataburger.  When it comes to getting fast-food hamburgers, they just cannot be beat. Period.

Recently some stuff regarding open carry and Whataburger resurfaced. Whataburger just responded (again) to the matter:

There’s been a lot of talk the past couple weeks about Whataburger’s open carry policy, and I wanted to reach out to personally explain our position.

Whataburger supports customers’ Second Amendment rights and we respect your group’s position, but we haven’t allowed the open carry of firearms in our restaurants for a long time (although we have not prohibited licensed conceal carry). It’s a business decision we made a long time ago and have stood by, and I think it’s important you know why.

But first, as a representative of Whataburger, I want you to know we proudly serve the gun rights community. I personally enjoy hunting and also have my concealed carry license, as do others at Whataburger.

From a business standpoint, though, we have to think about how open carry impacts our 34,000+ employees and millions of customers. We serve customers from all walks of life at more than 780 locations, 24 hours a day, in 10 states and we’re known for a family friendly atmosphere that customers have come to expect from us. We’re the gathering spot for Little League teams, church groups and high school kids after football games.

We’ve had many customers and employees tell us they’re uncomfortable being around someone with a visible firearm who is not a member of law enforcement, and as a business, we have to listen and value that feedback in the same way we value yours. We have a responsibility to make sure everyone who walks into our restaurants feels comfortable. For that reason, we don’t restrict licensed concealed carry but do ask customers not to open carry in our restaurants.

As a company serving customers with many different viewpoints, we’re sometimes caught in the middle on controversial issues like this one. We hope you and your members, along with our other friends in the gun rights community, understand our position and will continue to visit us. We appreciate your business. Thank you.

Sincerely,
Preston Atkinson
Whataburger President and CEO

This was posted yesterday (July 2, 2015) to their company website.

Frankly I have to wonder.

Is this a response to open carry? Or a response to the shit-tacular tactics of some open carry groups in the past year or so, trying to “lobby” for “gun rights”?

That is, is Whataburger against open carry? Or are they against dumbassery? Personally, I think the latter (based upon my reading of Mr Atkinson’s remarks).

There’s much over Whataburger’s history that has demonstrated they are very much a “‘murica” type of place. But on the same token, they have a business to run, shareholders to answer to, and the families and well-being of 34,000+ employees — to lose business (and revenue) does not serve their bottom-line nor the people who rely upon Whataburger to feed their families. I do NOT blame Mr. Atkinson one bit for taking this approach.

I don’t have a problem with open carry, but I do have a problem with dumbasses. And especially dumbasses whose actions backfire and wind up causing more harm than good — which is precisely what the actions of so many “open carriers” have done in the past few years.

Gee thanx but no thanx. You’re not helping. Sit down and shut up.

I will still give my business to Whataburger. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with the position held here. Come on… you believe in property rights and the right to conduct yourself as you see fit.

But that said, I do wonder… when the new laws in Texas take effect, what will Whataburger do? Will the new 30.07 signs be posted?

And I’ve also wondered, will we see more signage (the 30.07 and then as long as they’re at it, the 30.06 as well) posted now? If so, we have only the open-carry-jackasses to thank for setting us (and themselves) back.

Summary of new Texas gun laws

The 2015 Texas Legislative Session ended, and so some new gun laws are going into effect. Biggest press goes to the Open Carry and Campus Carry laws, but there are others.

Here’s a link to the summary of the new laws from the Texas Department of Public Safety.

There are a bunch of laws going into effect that didn’t get much press. Pay attention to those as well.

Note that a lot of other laws went into effect. For example, a knife rights preemption will go into effect September 1, which should clean things up and not make simple pocket knives illegal in places like San Antonio.

One big thing for folks to realize. While traditionally new laws go into effect on September 1, that’s NOT the case with the 2 big gun laws.

Open Carry takes effect January 1, 2016.

Campus Carry takes effect August 1, 2016, and for public junior colleges August 1, 2017.

BE AWARE.

DON’T BE STUPID.

Oh, and it seems we have a new TLA. While we figured CHL (Concealed Handgun License) would become a HL (handgun license),  it seems it will now be an LTC – License To Carry.

We LTC Instructors are still waiting to get the full skinny from DPS, so you just gotta be patient like the rest of us. Once we know, we’ll let you know.

Handshakes aren’t always polite

Greg Ellifritz writes about how a simple handshake can be used as a ruse to get dangerously close to you.

I feel conflicted about personal safety techniques that make you come across as rude or unfriendly, because the majority of the time the situation is innocuous and now you just look like a jerk. But, there’s always a way to handle the situation that helps you maintain a friendly rapport yet keep you safe. Greg’s article offers a few such suggestions for dealing with this case.

One I recently picked up and will work to employ is how to disengage from street approaches. You know the situation: dude walks up to you asking for a cigarette or a light or the time, and there’s a host of ways to break off contact. A favorite of fellow KR Training instructor Tom Hogel is to say “Yeah, about 4:30″ and keep on walking. It works because it’s an unexpected response to their script and resets their OODA Cycle. The response I recently picked up comes from William Aprill. His response is “No, but THANKS!” and saying “thanks” in a very cheerful and earnest tone. I like this because it resets the OODA Cycle, it responds and ends the contact, and you don’t risk coming off as rude — which I think matters not so much to dude, but in the eyes of others, especially if this happens when you’re in the company of friends that may not regard personal safety in the same light as yourself.

What stood out to me more from Greg’s article tho was his closing remarks regarding handshakes and open carry:

Hock Hockheim also has some interesting information on handshake problems in this article.  Have any of you open carriers considered this ruse?  What if someone approached you in a public place and said “I commend you for carrying your gun openly and appreciate that you are providing a visual deterrent against criminals.”  After saying this, he extends his hand to shake yours.  Would you shake?  If you are carrying your gun openly in a holster without retention, it might not be such a good idea!

2015-07-02 training log

Deload continues.

Nothing exciting to report. Just get in, do work, get out. Rest.

Based on Paul Carter’s “Guaranteed Muscle Mass” article.

  • Front Squat
    • bar x 5
    • bar x 5
    • 95 x 5
    • 115 x 4
    • 135 x 3
    • 165 x 2
    • 185 x 1
    • 155 x 5
  • Leg Press
    • 315 x 10
    • 315 x 10
    • 315 x 10

When you assume…

Whether you acknowledge it or not, you have a concept of what (your) attacker will look like.

Ask anyone about violent crime, about being attacked, and ask them to describe their attacker. Oh, they may not have fine-details down, like the color of their eyes, but they do have some sort of notion about the person – or the sort of person – that would attack them.

Often times it’s male, probably in the 18-30 age range. They’d probably be dressed in some sort of “covering garb”, like a mask or something else that obscures the face, with dark, long-sleeved clothing; people don’t imagine a Hawaiian shirt and Bermuda shorts.

As well, they might imagine the person’s circumstance, like they’re just some drug-addict looking for a quick score.

Stereotypes come from somewhere, usually seeded in truth. The problem comes when we start to base life-important decisions upon stereotypes.

I recently came across a discussion on Facebook on the topic of firearms. A person with a fairly anti-gun stance was coming from an angle of “assault weapons are stupid and unnecessary for home defense”. He said:

Most criminals look for soft, easy options. If you
don’t have an alarm system, but your neighbour does, and the crook is in your neighbourhood, guess what? Yup, you are getting broken into. Same goes for screens, and doors. They look for the soft options.

Now, he is correct. Fundamental rules of home safety/defense really start with other matters such as having locks and using them, having alarm systems and using them, and other things you can do to make your home a less-appealing target (relative to your neighbors). But this is not a discussion of home safety/defense.

What stood out to me was his assumption of who would be coming to break into your home, and under what circumstances. And thus, based upon those stereotypes and assumptions, whether guns (or a particular type of gun) was or was not appropriate/worthy/legitimate of use.

Back in April, John Hearne was on Ballistic Radio discussing the Newhall Massacre of 1970. If you’re unfamiliar with the incident, give a listen to the episode, or you should at least read about it.

Two men, Bobby Davis and Jack Twinning, were well-established violent felons before the incident, determined to not go back to jail and not be captured. In Newhall, they murdered 4 CHP officers. As they fled the scene of the initial shootout, the men split up. Davis came upon a camper, violently assaulted the owner, and took off in the camper. Twinning broke into a nearby home, and took the occupants hostage.

How do men like Davis and Twinning fit into your assumptions?

These were sophisticated, violent criminals, determined to do whatever it took to escape or die trying. They came upon innocent, uninvolved people – like yourself – and inflicted violence upon them for, what would appear to the victim as, “no good reason”.

Was this an anomalous situation? Certainly. But like many things, statistics are of little comfort when you’re the exception.

It is dangerous and risky to your life and the lives of those you love to predicate behavior upon assumptions, especially when there are solid facts that you could better predicate upon. Take time to examine your assumptions, discarding what is incorrect, and revising to make better.

Writing about whatever interests me, and maybe you.

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