Your business, or your rights?

The other day when I attended my Texas Concealed Handgun Instructor certification renewal class, many people arrived quite early (including myself). While in line waiting for the doors to open, I listened to a lot of the conversations happening around me.

One of the big topics was the recent changes to the CHL-related laws: the change in number of hours (4-6 hours for the classroom), and the removal of classroom/proficiency for renewals. There were many comments and much discussion going on about the various aspects and impacts this had, but one line of discussion stood out to me.

There was talk about loss of business. This makes sense. If people had to come to you for renewals but now that need is eliminated, that’s a fair portion of your business killed off. And now if people don’t need to be in your classroom for as much time, you just can’t charge as much money for those classes.

I cannot deny this affects and hurts business, and there were voices expressing how upset they were the law changed in a manner that damaged their business. I cannot fault them for being upset about this.

But what do you want?

If there was open carry and Constitutional Carry in Texas, you wouldn’t have any business at all! Are you saying it’s more important to preserve your business model than your fundamental rights?

I’m not necessarily advocating one way or the other, but just step back from your emotions for a moment and consider your stance.

Meantime, I see many ways in which the change in the law actually opens doors for creative business-folk to offer more classes, more instruction, and work in ways that can improve the class, capability, and confidence of Texas CHL holders. Of course, it might mean you have to get out and expand your business, your marketing efforts, your own skills and résumé so you can offer these things and still grow your business. But isn’t that what America is supposed to be about? You getting off your duff and building the future you want, instead of having the government structure and hand you something?

 

2 thoughts on “Your business, or your rights?

  1. Are you saying it’s more important to preserve your business model than your fundamental rights?

    This is one of the problems I have with requiring training for the exercise of a right — there becomes a huge economic incentive to keep rising the bar, not lowering it. And I’m not just cracking on Instructors either; taxes become important in the scheme of things also.

    I look at the licensing requirements for so many businesses and wonder if we really need such requirements — the same way I look at it for CHL — or is it simply people protecting their businesses.

    I see many ways in which the change in the law actually opens doors for creative business-folk to offer more classes, more instruction, and work in ways that can improve the class, capability, and confidence of Texas CHL holders.

    I agree and actually think that many Instructors are missing the boat on what the public wants. I understand some have a business model of providing a service in order to obtain the CHL but ask is that all the public wants?

    The training provided by KR Training shows there is a demand for more. I would be willing to bet (and seriously considering doing just that) there is a demand for a class where people consider the ethical as well as practical aspects of gun ownership, with a focus on concealed carry. Have to do a little more research to see what people want but I know from conversations I’ve had there are many people who want to learn about concealed carry, about the state and federal laws without going through the hassle of getting a license.

    • Well, I can say in the case of Texas CHL, there’s no business protection here… at least, as the law has been changing. I mean, the reduction of classroom hours for original CHL, the fact you can just renew online… there’s no protecting nor propping up of a business model here. In fact, part of the point was to make it easier for folks to get CHL — less time off work, less fees, less costs. So, it’s a step in that direction.

      But yes, it’s arguable any form of fees, instruction, testing… it all costs money. Is it a form of poll tax?

      You raise an interesting point about learning the ethics without all the other overhead of getting a license. There may be interest, but not sure if it’s viable overall. What I could see are a few things:

      1. someone could produce an online video series, allowing interesting people to watch at their leisure.
      2. just read certain blogs… 😉
      3. audit a class.

      I’m not sure about CHL, but I do know Karl sometimes allows people to audit his KR Training classes (y’all would have to talk to Karl about the specifics of that — I don’t handle that, I don’t know all his critieria; I just have seen it happen). So I do wonder if someone could talk to a CHL Instructor about auditing — they can just show up, listen, ask questions, but no paperwork, no authorization. I’m not sure if DPS has any issues or restrictions there — I’m not aware of any, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t.

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